Wolf V 1.2 — a sequenced loop delay

Wolf began as an attempt to produce a Thermae-ish patch, and in some ways, it is, I think, pretty successful, and in other ways, for those of you who just want a Thermae, well, it’s not a Thermae. But it definitely draws inspiration from the Thermae and it is capable of some very interesting delay sounds.

The idea is a sequenced, pitched delay using loopers as the foundation for the sound, then employing delay lines to provide the delay aspect. You can sequence up to four steps; you can glide between different pitches; and you can reverse any or all (or none) of the steps.

There are also two feedback paths: one uses the delay lines for a traditional sort of delay sound (although each channel of the delay has a separate clock divider and their outputs are cross-fed for ping-pong and L-R-C-style delays). The other feeds the output of the loopers back into themselves, which produces pitched and reversed repeats that shift with the sequence.

“Wolf” was a working title–just something I filled in to differentiate it from “empty slot”–that is now this patch’s permanent title because I didn’t want to make it shouty (firmware 1.10 has a capslock bug; this patch is otherwise optimized for 1.10, which includes use of new colors and more importantly the option to use a -1 to 1 value module with a quantized output). I suppose I could revert to a previous firmware, name things, set it back on 1.10… etc. But “Wolf” is fine. Names are hard.

A note: the loopers are mostly stable. I’ve worked really hard to get them as stable as I can. But they aren’t foolproof, and sometimes they glitch. Not a ton. But sometimes. What are you going to do? I do note, if you watch the video, I’ve noticed it must more prone to glitching when the glide setting is between ~.3-.4. I don’t know why. If I knew why, I would fix it. But instead, I just contemplate accelerating my male pattern baldness by pulling out hair.

The patch is stereo throughout.

A special thanks to my patrons on Patreon for their support: Rob Flax, Stepan Grammatik, brockstar, Mats Unnerholm, D Sing, Will Scott, drew batchelor, Miguel, Steve Bragg, Joab Eastley, Tomi Kokki, Mitch Lantz, Ben Norland, Roman Jakobej, Mark Crosbie, Steve Codling, Timothy Cleary, Soren Made, Ken Luke, Mike Ryan, Vilis Klavins, Nick, Joseph August, Jonathan Carp, Liam Britten, Nick Ruck, Simon Provencher, and Alec Fellman!

If you would like to support my work on ZOIA, please visit patreon.com/chmjacques

Controls:

Stompswitches:

Left, momentary — tap tempo (there is also MIDI clock, which will override the tap tempo). An interesting effect is that when you tap a new tempo, the currently playing step will continue to loop while it waits for the new tempo. So you can sort of hold a step for a few seconds. Don’t hold it too long, because if the recording buffer of the quieted looper exceeds the buffer length of the looper, it will become unsynced and badness will happen.

Middle, latching — delay hold. Increases the feedback of the delay feedback path to maximum. Because of the filtering, the loop created will eventually degrade and decay, but it provides a layer of pseudo-looping in the interim

Right, latching — loop hold. Increases the feedback of the looper feedback path to maximum.

Front page:

The center piece of the front page are color-coded steps, corresponding to the steps of the sequence. A light will come on when each step is playing back. Above this light is a series of pushbuttons that allow you to control the length of the sequence, from 1 to 4 steps. Make sure only one pushbutton is selected. There is a value module to control the pitch of each step, and an option to reverse a given step.

To the left side are sort of “tone-shaping” controls. There is an aliaser and a bit crusher to allow you to produce more dirty, lo-fi sounds. Then, there is a filter, which is placed in the feedback paths, allowing the feedback to decay and darken for a more “analog” sound. As you adjust the filter, you may hear clicking; the filter is a multi-filter (I prefer this for a filter placed in a feedback path, because of its low resonance, but the multi-filter requires a lot of CPU headroom when adjusted; the clipping sound will fade as soon as you select a new frequency for the filter).

Then, there is a glide control, which sets the amount of glide between steps. Longer glide amounts may mean the given step never reaches its designated pitch (not necessarily a bad thing; you can get all sorts of unique warbles from this effect).

There is a mod section, which begins with a MOD ON button (named in 1.10). Beside it is a light that oscillates with the modulation. The modulation is a randomized triangle; its depth and speed are both augmented by a random module’s output. The speed control goes from very slow (wows and warbles) to very fast (tape-style fluttering). The depth control goes from very subtle to not very subtle; I suggest a light touch.

On the right side are signal path controls.

Mix sets the wet/dry mix.

Delay feedback sets the amount of feedback that occurs via delay line.

Looper feedback sets the amount of feedback that occurs via the signal being sent back into the loopers.

At the bottom of the page are two lights, one on either side, that blink. These indicate the relative speeds of the left delay line and right delay line. Their clock dividers are found on the next page, along with a button that can be used to reset them. Because each delay line has an independent clock and because they feed back into one another, they can be used to create ping-pong, L-R-C delays, and other interesting, cycling delays that take advantage of the stereo space.

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  • Category: Effect Sound
  • Revision: 1.3 -- See comment
  • License: Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 4.0
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  • Modified: 31 mins ago
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7 comments on “Wolf V 1.2 — a sequenced loop delay
  • Christopher H. M. Jacques on said:

    V 1.1

    This revision came about through discussion with YouTuber Waveshapes, so credit goes to them. It is a very minor revision that mostly affects the footswitches:

    Left stompswitch — tap tempo (same as original and as in the original, MIDI clock will override tap tempo)

    Middle stompswitch — resets the sequence to step 1 at the next step

    Waveshapes suggested this as a way to sync the patch to other effects when changing songs/sections. It also has some interesting performance aspects, since you can set a 4-step sequence, then choose how many of those steps it plays (e.g. play 2 steps, play 2 steps, play 4 steps, play 3 steps) by using the footswitch to reset the sequencer.

    Right — HOLD on

    Whereas before there were individual footswitches to toggle the delay hold or the looper hold (which, in both cases, set their feedback to maximum, holding the buffer indefinitely, although the filter would cause them to degrade and decay over time), now there is a new pushbutton on the front page which determines which target this stompswitch controls: off/dim = delay hold, on/bright = looper hold. Pixels will indicate which, if either, of the holds is active.

    You can still set both feedback paths to maximum using the controls on the front page. I generally found that using both at the same time was…………….. uh, a little unruly.

  • Christopher H. M. Jacques on said:

    V 1.2 — P-S and FXD

    This is, I think, a _really_ cool update. I want to give a shout out to meanmedianmoge, who helped inspire this update in a conversation we had about Blooper.

    There are actually two versions of the patch included in the .zip file: P-S and FXD (I also included 1.1–notes on that version in the comment above–, in case you preferred it, so that it would still be available, and because, although I have done testing and been satisfied with the results, the additional features in 1.2 potentially introduce more instability to the loopers’ operation).

    First, let’s talk about a few things that are missing in this version if compared to V 1.1, just so you know the trade-offs:

    * The right stompswitch now only directs to the delay’s feedback, maxing it out; the option to target the loopers’ feedback has been removed (I never used this; if you want to max the loopers’ feedback, this can still be done from the front panel).

    * The pixels on the bottom left and right corner of the front page, indicating the timing of the left and right delay lines have been removed. You can still monitor this on the second page, if you want, as this is where the delays’ clock dividers are located.

    * The modulation section has been slightly reworked to be less CPU-intensive; it is the same basic premise, however, of a randomly modulated triangle wave.

    * Some controls on the left side of the control panel have shifted (and some have been added, which leads me to….)

    There are two major changes in this version:

    * At the bottom of the page is a blue control called “Length.” This controls the length of the loop used to form the delay. As the “Length” is reduced, the end point of the loop moves; in a loop with no pitch shifting (i.e. A0) a length of .5000 will cut the length in half. In other words, when the loop reads its midpoint, it will restart. A length of .7500 will cut the length to a quarter, etc. All manner of glitchy textures can be achieved this way.

    But things get really interesting when you introduce pitch shifting, which is why there are two versions bundled in this release. “P-S” stands for a patch version where the loopers use the “pre-speed” option. “FXD” stands for a patch version where the loopers use the “fixed” option.

    What is the difference between the two? When using P-S, the length of the loop is affected _before_ any speed/pitch change is made to it. In other words, the length of the loop, and therefore its end point, is relative to the speed of the loop.

    Consider this example: the “Length” control is set to .500, and the pitch is set to one octave above (A1). Since this change in pitch doubles the speed of the loop, it normally plays what it records twice, an octave above. Here, that loop would be cut in half, producing four truncated loops in the same step.

    When using FXD, the length of the loop is considered _after_ any speed/pitch change is made to it. (Or rather, the length is treated as unrelated to the speed/pitch.) In other words, the length of the loop is treated as absolute, and so its end point is also treated as relative to that absolute measure, rather than than determined by the speed.

    Let’s use the same example, with a “Length” of .500 and a pitch one octave above (A1). Since this speed normally results in the loop playing in half the time it was recorded in, there will be no change; it will play exactly as a double-speed loop would play. If, however, we change the pitch to an octave below (-A1), that loop will _also_ play twice during the step; the length will adjust accordingly, and it will only repeat a quarter of what was recorded during that step before it begins to repeat.

    This means that all of the steps that have the “Length Edit” selected will loop the same number of times, even if set to different pitches, which has some very cool rhythmic repercussions; it also sounds just nuts when glide is applied, since all of the loops during the transitions between pitches will also be the same length.

    In either version, you can determine whether this “Length” parameter is applied to any given step by toggling the appropriately colored “Length Edit” button.

    * There is also a new resonance control for the filters. It does not go to extreme resonance, because extreme resonance was not pleasant. I’ve tried to attenuate it to give a nice range. 0.000 corresponds to the default setting. 1.000 increases the resonance just enough to either accentuate certain frequencies in repeats or, when the delay increased or maxed, drive the feedback into distortion/oscillation (as the increased resonance introduces gain into the feedback path). Since the filters are multi-filters, you may hear some clicking as you adjust this control.

    And… that’s V 1.2. I’m also including a video, because this is a lot to take in. Or you can just fiddle with the “Length” control and the sequencer buttons; it’s kind of easier to hear than explain.

    A special thanks to my patrons on Patreon for their support: Rob Flax, Stepan Grammatik, brockstar, Mats Unnerholm, D Sing, Will Scott, drew batchelor, Miguel, Steve Bragg, Joab Eastley, Tomi Kokki, Mitch Lantz, Ben Norland, Roman Jakobej, Mark Crosbie, Steve Codling, Timothy Cleary, Soren Made, Ken Luke, Mike Ryan, Vilis Klavins, Nick, Joseph August, Jonathan Carp, Liam Britten, Nick Ruck, Simon Provencher, Alec Fellman, Ben Cerezo, Rick Munro, and Pierre Martin!

    If you would like to support my work on ZOIA, please visit patreon.com/chmjacques

    https://youtu.be/xxoS2I7eqaw

  • Waveshapes on said:

    Hi Christopher.

    I never got around to thanking you for the 1.1 update, partly on my request. I’ll test it out today, have been playing massively with the first edition, really love it.

    What i actually meant with the sequence reset, was actually to have it reset to step 1, exactly when the button is pressed, and not on next step. I imagine, that i will at some point want to be able to sync the sequence to a drummer’s click, where we have the same BPM in our monitors, but the sequence may be offset to this, but at the same bpm.

    You know what i mean? I don’t know if it’s possible in the current state of the patch.

    Gonna try out all three revisions tonight hopefully, can’t wait! :) Thanks a bunch

  • Christopher H. M. Jacques on said:

    That’s actually much harder (and more CPU-intensive) than it would seem to be (or frankly, should be; a change was made to sequencers a few firmwares ago which… ****ed them, and I would really like them to get un-****ed). I’ll see what I can do, but no promises there.

  • Christopher H. M. Jacques on said:

    Also, just as an aside, and for the benefit of anyone who reads this, for actual purposes of communication (i.e. something different than offering a note of thanks or sharing a clip where you use a patch), Patchstorage comments are…. really, really terrible. There’s no notification system; nothing tells me there’s a new comment on an upload other than a count on the site page that it’s easy to lose track of, etc..; if I didn’t tend to monitor uploads for the first couple of days, it might be weeks or months (or never) until I see a question/suggestion/recommendation.

    TL;DR: If you want to get in touch with a patch creator, and you have another means of reaching them, use whatever those other means are. Comments: great for saying thanks; terrible for timely engagement.

  • Waveshapes on said:

    Thanks for the reply. I’ll contact you by other channels of communication the next time :) pure coincidence i checked here just now, was expecting an email incase you’d respond.

    I hope the change is doable, but if it’s not, i guess i’ll live with it :) It’s kinda the same challenge that the thermae presents. I found that the sequencer only resets if you bypass the pedal and trails mode is off. which kinda makes sense.

    That way the pedal can be engaged at the right time and the seq is in sync

  • Christopher H. M. Jacques on said:

    Wolf 1.3 P-S and FXD

    Some changes with this revision:

    — The middle stompswitch will not reset the sequence as soon as it is released, rather than on the next beat. (h/t Soren — I think I finally got it right?)

    — There is a pushbutton in the bottom left hand corner called “TAP OR LENGTH”: When it is off, the left stompswitch will behave as it always has, providing tap tempo. When it is on, the function of the left stompswitch will change, and it will allow you to turn the “Length edit” option off and on. I figured this would provide an interesting performance option, as well as giving the footswitch some functionality for those using MIDI clock instead of tap. Then the “Length edit” is active, a yellow pixel will light up next to the row.

    — I realized I made a goof in my signal flow; the filter for the loops was located before the loopers, which meant that when the loop was sped/pitched up, the filter didn’t have quite the effect I wanted, in terms of taming high frequencies (it still did this, but by basically muddying the source more than anything else).

    I have adjusted the signal path so that the filters follow the loopers, rather than precede them. If you preferred the previous filter path, you can disable the filter for the loopers by pressing the peach pushbutton I added to the bottom right corner (and to be clear, although you will probably hear it easily: when the pushbutton is ON, the filters are BYPASSED; I didn’t want to sacrifice CPU on an invert, so we’re going to live with the slight eccentricity).

    When bypassed, the filters in the delay feedback path will not be affected; they will still respond to the frequency set by the filter control. But it will affect the looper feedback path, which will lose filtering on its repeats.

    I’m interested in feedback on this change in particular; I can always change the signal path back. But I’m open to responses to any of the other changes.

    A special thanks to my patrons on Patreon for their support: Rob Flax, Stepan Grammatik, brockstar, Mats Unnerholm, D Sing, Will Scott, drew batchelor, Miguel, Steve Bragg, Joab Eastley, Tomi Kokki, Mitch Lantz, Ben Norland, Roman Jakobej, Mark Crosbie, Steve Codling, Timothy Cleary, Soren Made, Ken Luke, Mike Ryan, Vilis Klavins, Nick, Joseph August, Jonathan Carp, Liam Britten, Nick Ruck, Simon Provencher, Alec Fellman, Ben Cerezo, Rick Munro, and Pierre Martin!

    If you would like to support my work on ZOIA, please visit patreon.com/chmjacques

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